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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 198-205

Bacteriology of orofacial space infections-A retrospective study


1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Drs. Sudha and Nageswara Rao Siddhartha Institutes of Dental Sciences, Chinaoutapalli, Gannavaram (M), Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Vishnu Dental College and Hospital, West Godavari, Bhimavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India
3 Dr. PSIMS and RF, Chinaoutapalli, Gannavaram (M), Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Uppaluru Vijaya Lakshmi
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Drs. Sudha and Nageswara Rao Siddhartha Institutes of Dental Sciences, Chinaoutapalli, Gannavaram (M), Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JDRNTRUHS.JDRNTRUHS_9_18

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Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess causative micro-organisms responsible for Orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin, and to evaluate their sensitivity to various antibiotics used in the treatment of these infections. Methods: The bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility of major pathogens in 30 patients with orofacial odontogenic infections were examined excluding the patients who were on prior antibiotic therapy, who were diagnosed to be immunocompromised and the patients were on immunosuppressants and the following patients underwent incision and drainage and received IV antibiotics. Results: A total of 46 bacterial strains were isolated from 30 patients out of which five patients' culture results were sterile. The most common aerobic bacteria isolated were Viridans Streptococci, Klebsiella Pneumonia and Streptococcus Pyogens, and anaerobic bacteria were Porphyromonas Gingivalis, Streptococci, Fusobacterium and Prevotella Melanogenicus. As per our study, Gentamycin (84%) and Cefotaxime (80%) were the most effective antibiotics. Conclusion: In conclusion, the surgical treatment incision and drainage must always be in the foreground for the therapy of orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin. Cultures and sensitivities commonly showed greater growth in aerobes (76%) than in anaerobes (23.9%).


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